Abandoned Cart Emails: Using Psychological Principles To Influence Customers' Decisions
  • Abandoned Cart Emails: Using Psychological Principles To Influence Customers’ Decisions

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How much do you hate seeing abandoned carts? 

I don’t like them either. 

But they are inevitable…just like bounce rates. 

When we conducted a research study on around 10% of lost revenue through abandoned cart emails. 

Another study by Barrilliance concluded that shopping cart abandonments have been on the rise since 2016 but drop around holidays such as Cyber Monday. 

But what really makes customers leave a site without completing a purchase?               

Now that you have asked, let’s take a look at the three most common reasons for shopping cart abandonments: 

Lack of trust

Trust is probably the most scarce and valuable resource online, yet it’s the most important one. 

No one is willing to provide their credit card info on a website that doesn’t indicate trustworthiness or have any trust seals. 

Fortunately, there are tons of things you can do to 37.5% increase in conversions. Here are some examples of product reviews in abandoned cart emails: 

Customer testimonials: The testimonial from happy customers who already use a product goes a long way in persuading others to try it out as well. This reassures other customers that they will find value in the product as well. 

Awards: If your company has received awards, showcasing your achievements gives your business some a new level of credibility that encourages people to click through the email campaign and check it out.

Media mentions: if you are lucky enough to have had your product mentioned by well-known news publications and sites, then including that in your emails can convince customers to make a purchase. Press mentions have the same effect as awards, they give your business instant credibility and ity with your potential customers.

Scarcity and urgency

Scarcity is one of the principles highlighted in Dr. Robert Cialdini’s book, Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion. The concept of scarcity is simple – customers tend to place a higher value on items that are in short supply. It’s basically a psychological principle tied to the law of supply and demand. 

Including the scarcity principle in your abandoned cart email sequence bears juicy fruits. If your prospects believe that a product is about to run out or be out of stock, this can motivate them to take action. 

Shakers’ abandoned cart emails is good example of a scarcity principle in action:  

The above email advises recipients to make a purchase before the product they left on their carts, gets sold out. 

There are many variations of the scarcity principle. Sometimes it can be tied to the urgency principle. I mean, they both use fear of missing out (FOMO) as a motivator. 

Let’s take a look at Levi’s abandoned cart email as an example: 

As you can see from the above image, Levi’s gives a 25% discount offer that will expire in 48 hours. This creates a sense of urgency and, on the other hand, it tells the customer that this offer won’t be available forever. 

But I have to warn you about this principle. How you word the scarcity principle in your emails is what will determine the effectiveness of your emails. 

If  you approach the scarcity concept as if there used to be a ton of a product or service, but they are running out, people might be too reluctant.  But, if you approach it from the angle that the product is a limited edition, people must be very receptive. 

Loss Aversion

There is a thin line that separates loss aversion and the scarcity principle. The loss aversion and the scarcity principle might have the same shadow, but they are not the same. Had to say this, so that you know that this section is not a bleed off of the previous one. 

Loss aversion means pretty much exactly what it sounds like: when one has something, they will try by all means to avoid losing it. According to Psychology Today, people seem to value a loss more than an equivalent gain – we are afraid of $100 than we are happy of finding $100. 

Our aversion to loss is a strong emotion and expression of fear. When you can word your abandoned cart emails in a way that makes someone feel the pain of not taking action (with loss aversion), you can convince them to buy immediately. 

Here is a perfect example of the loss aversion principle at play in an abandoned cart email: 

The above Sumo email is not about promoting benefits of the product, those three bullet points make you feel the pain of missing out on what the product offers.

If you are going to send a series of abandoned cart emails, make sure you don’t use the loss aversion more than once. If you bombard your customers with a pile of loss aversion emails, this principle won’t be effective and your customers won’t believe you. 

In a paper called The Boundaries of Loss Aversion, Novemsky and Kahneman point out that loss aversion only works when people believe there’s something to lose. 

Paradox of Choice 

In his 2004 book, The Paradox of Choice, Barry Schwartz argues that eliminating consumer choices can greatly reduce anxiety for shoppers. 

In this context, shining the spotlight on a single product is much more effective than adding multiple products to your abandoned cart emails. I mean, it’s much easier (and requires less mental investment) to consider two options and make a quick decision.

Everlane’s abandoned cart email is a great example of how to leverage the paradox of choice by limiting customers’ options: 

Look at how they present one product and shine the spotlight on it in their emails. This gives them more room to communicate the unique selling proposition of that one item.  

So, let’s say a customer left 20 items in their cart, what then should be done? 

That happens most of the time, but it still doesn’t make sense to present all of those products at once as that might dilute the effectiveness of your emails. Presenting two or three options is understandable –most eCommerce stores Asics do that: 

 

 

But in a situation where the customers left many items in their cart, here’s what you can do: 

  1. Break up your abandoned cart emails into a series, each with its own subject line. 
  2. Only present your best selling/highest-rated product in their cart –if it converted for many of your previous customers, it has a higher chance of selling. 

Yes the idea behind cart abandonment emails is to remind users about products they placed on their carts, but the main goal is to convince them to make a purchase. It becomes difficult to do so if you present many choices. 

My dear friend, choices are great, sure, but too many choices will cause decision paralysis within your target buyers. 

Personalization

Personalization in cart abandonment emails induces higher customer engagement rates and reduces cart abandonment rates by 10%-30%.

If personalization has the power to reduce the cart abandonment rate on your site, imagine what it can do when used in your emails?  

Yes, you’re right…it can help drive growth and long-term customer value. 

Nowadays, when we talk about personalization in email marketing we are referring to customization that goes beyond addressing customers by their names on subject lines. 

Now the bar is set at deeply understanding the stage at which customers are on in the buyers’ journey and then offering distinct web and mobile experiences for each customer that you send the email to. 

As Seth Godin says: 

“[Personalization] is a chance to differentiate at a human scale, to use behavior as the most important clue about what people want and more important, what they need.”

Basically, when we talk about personalizing cart abandonment emails, we are really talking about customizing the type of content that is used in each email to each customer. This can be done by: 

Let’s break it down a little further: 

Need an example of a cart abandoned email that is customized to offer help to customers who might have abandoned their carts due to confusion? Look no further than this UGMonk abandoned cart email: 

They make it seem like the owner and designer of the company is reaching out directly to answer any questions that customers might have. 

Need an example of a cart abandonment email that is customized for first-time customers who are price sensitive? Take a look at Pinterest’s email: 

The most important thing before you even think about personalization, is to know what your customers need, once you obtain that knowledge then you can serve them the right message at the right time, and drive business results.

Conclusion

Face-to-face interactions are the basis for much of our personal fulfillment, as humans – but in this increasingly email-based world, using psychological principles to write abandoned cart emails can get you the desired outcome. Your customers receive hundreds of emails on a daily basis, without using the psychological triggers, we mentioned in this post, it will be difficult for you to convince customers to make a purchase.

Simba Dube

Simba Dube is the Growth Marketing Manager at Invesp. He is passionate about marketing strategy, digital marketing, content marketing, and customer experience optimization.

View All Posts By Simba Dube
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